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The University of Arizona Museum of Art and Archive of Visual Arts

Museum Events

"Making Care" Pop Up

January 14 - February 11, 2023 Drop by the Our Stories Community Gallery anytime during open hours (Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) to play with art-making materials, check out sketch books to use in the galleries, create a zine or just slow down using the UAMA’s new guided meditation platform, The Art of Mindfulness.

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Saturday, February 4, 2023 | 9:00 AM With Valentine's Day a little over a week away, this Members Morning is about love – lost love, to be exact.

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Thursday, February 9, 2023 | 5:30 PM This talk takes place in the School of Art Atrium/UAMA Courtyard and is preceded by a reception for the BMC Playbook exhibition in Joseph Gross Gallery beginning at 4:00 p.m.

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Thursday, February 16, 2023 | 5:00 PM (AZ Time) In honor of Black History Month, this round will feature a selection of the myriad Black artists who have made, and are making, an invaluable impact on the art world. Many have been featured in previous rounds of Art Trivia, so it's a great time to test how much you've learned!

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Thursday, March 2, 2023 | 5:00 PM (AZ Time) In the late 1970s, a UAMA curator raised a question after seeing a poster of Wassily Kandinsky’s painting Ruhe. The label on the poster stated the work was in a private collection, a strange detail considering the painting was owned by the University of Arizona Museum of Art... Or was it?

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Spring Community Day (free admission all day)

Details coming soon!

Wednesday, March 22, 2023 | 5:00 PM When Willem de Kooning’s painting Woman-Ochre (1954-55) was stolen from the University of Arizona Museum of Art in 1985, its presence grew from an aura of absence. A blank spot on a gallery wall in the UAMA represented a mystery that went unsolved for over three decades, during which time the life of the painting became overshadowed by the story of its heist. Violently cut from its frame, the painting was to some degree cut from its place in art history, obscuring the controversial Abstract Expressionist figure herself who centered the canvas: Woman-Ochre.

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