The University of Arizona Museum of Art and Archive of Visual Arts

Salvador Dalí: Our Historical Heritage

Adam and Eve 1979 Drypoint etching with pochoir coloring Gift of Mr. Nicholas Kronwall
Jonah and the Whale 1979 Drypoint etching with pochoir coloring Gift of Mr. Nicholas Kronwall
Elijah 1979 Drypoint etching with pochoir coloring Gift of Mr. Nicholas Kronwall

February 14th – August 2, 2015

In 1939 Salvador Dalí (1904-1989) separated from his fellow Surrealist artists and moved to New York. This moment has traditionally marked the shift in his work from Surrealist, typically understood as groundbreaking and original, to “late” which has come to be known as commercialized, pompous and redundant.

Often overshadowed by his early paintings, the latter half of Dalí’s artistic career is finally receiving due attention by scholars and museums. No longer considered watered-down commercialized versions of his earlier pieces, his late works demonstrate the true breadth of his oeuvre.

Dalí began exploring religious themes in his art as early as the 1940s; these would become recurring elements throughout his artistic career. The portfolio, Our Historical Heritage, depicts events and historical figures from the Hebrew scriptures, rendered with the typical vigor and energy only found in a Dalí work.