The University of Arizona Museum of Art and Archive of Visual Arts

Designing Line and Space: the Art of Sara Wallach

A-Poem-For-Martha-Graham-II-Suite-on-Dance
A-Poem-For-Martha-Graham-with-total-eclipse-from-Suite-on-Dance
A-Poem-to-Panov-Who-Was-Not-Born-Free
Renewal-red-blue-gold
Robin-Redbreast-in-a-Cage-Would-Put-All-Heaven-in-a-Rage-black
The-Many-Colors-of-Adam
Winged-Victory

July 18– October 5, 2014

Sara Wallach described herself as a “designer of line and space” rather than the traditional titles of “printmaker,” “painter,” or “sculptor.” Her art focused on the principle that the space surrounding a line is as important as the line itself. Known for her unique sculptural etchings she called “Saragraphs,” the exhibition showcases her creativity and desire to create new forms.

Wallach’s art expressed her responses to nature and to humankind. By touching on topics such as freedom and equality, she communicated how she saw the world but also asked the viewer to participate. She wrote, “It is hoped that my work will not only bring pleasure to people, but will help to develop awareness in reassessing one’s own position in the world.”

The exhibition showcases Wallach’s etchings and draws heavily from the Sara Wallach Archive donated to the UAMA’s Archive of Visual Arts in 2012. The archives illustrate her extensive printmaking process of creating plates using a combination of acid and sculptural tools. Additionally, with photographs, sketches and her own writings, the exhibition illuminates the story of this life-long artist.